WTFWG the lingua franca of the Web 🌐
Making websites for my e-commerce startup has never been easier! ✨✨✨ Isaac McBoatyson, stuck in a Starbucks somewhere in LA WHY?! WHY WOULD YOU DO THIS?! Anonymous, seasoned web author Now I don't have to memorize as much cryptic code now, this is just what the world needed! Phartz McIntyre, creator of Insert Framework
What's New? One Tag to Rule Them All At WTFWG, we are very attentive to the way web applications are implemented in the 21st century. We noticed that semantic meaning generally does not matter anymore, as it only gets in the way of your design. Markup of various recent web applications show that they are not making full use of semantic HTML tags — instead, opting for a single tag that best describes the artist's intentions, div. So, we have streamlined HTML by effectively getting rid of most content tags. Instead, we replaced them with a single div tag, which you can simply abbreviate to d. ❌ The outdated way <h1>Why Rust?</h1> <h2>Performance</h2> <p> Rust is blazingly fast and memory-efficient: with no runtime or garbage collector, it can power performance-critical services, run on embedded devices, and easily integrate with other languages. </p> The modern way 👍🏽 <div class="heading">Why Rust?</div> <div class="subheading">Performance</div> <div class="paragraph"> Rust is blazingly fast and memory-efficient: with no runtime or garbage collector, it can power performance-critical services, run on embedded devices, and easily integrate with other languages. </div> This change allows greater flexibility in how web elements are handled using CSS and Javascript. Several CSS frameworks have demonstrated the speed in which you can adjust the appearance of each element to your liking by adding classes, and so this can be leveraged to your advantage. In addition, this will also simplify website generators due to having only several elements to worry about. As a result, more features for them would be made possible quicker, and will result in more beautiful-looking websites in the future. What About Links? You'll be happy to know that we have kept the a tag, and it also doubles as a replacement for span, b, i, and every other inline element! ❌ The outdated way <p> We strive to create a <em>safe and secure</em> environment for our <strong>employees</strong>. For more information, you can <a href="localhost">see our mission statement</a>. </p> The modern way 👍🏽 <d class="paragraph"> We strive to create a <a class="italic">safe and secure</a> environment for our <a class="bold">employees</a>. For more information, you can <a class="link" href="localhost">see our mission statement</a>. </d> A number of elements were retained after positive feedback from WTFWG's sponsors, namely a few inline block elements such as img and br. For more information, refer to the documentation. Built for You HTML was designed to be very forgiving, and relatively easy to learn. After all, it is the language in which anyone can set up their personal web spaces. By simplifying the markup, we hope to make HTML even more approachable to anyone in the world wanting to make their presence known. Ship Faster Most people will rely on web frameworks that are work-safe, scalable, battle-tested and most importantly speed up time-to-market. By cutting down the number of elements available, you will no longer need to worry about accessibility and compatibility, both of which are development bottlenecks. If you do however need accessibility support, we advise that you use ARIA attributes. This also applies to the equivalent of semantic tags that have been defined in HTML 5. For example, the nav tag should be replaced with <d class="navigation" role="navigation" aria-label="Menu"> HTML 8 would not have been possible without our sponsors:

This is the future of web dev.

This is what happens when you only think of a web site in terms of individual components and graphic art.

As long as it doesn't get in the way of implementing your Figma mockup, anything goes.

Yes, this page is satire, you dip